©

Step - Vampire Weekend

We were trying to make some living, breathing album art with this one." —Rostam

(Source: teamvampireweekend, via koenisser)

stianrasmussen:

Houses of New Orleans

(via rapgame-crackgame)

judymartn:

American Horror Story: Murder House

 A Summary

(Source: judymartn, via m00psieshd)

wings-for-castiel:

totallysonic:

iranawaywiththedoctor:

Things I shout while playing any video game ever:

  • YOU FUCKING HOE
  • YOUR MOTHER SHOULD HAVE SWALLOWED YOU
  • I FUCKING (SCREAMS)
  • FUCKING BALLS
  • OH WHAT THE ACTUAL LIVING FUCK 
  • YOU CAN SUCK MY SWEATY FUCKING BALLS
  • I HATE THIS GAME
  • FUCK
  • FUCKING 
  • FUCK ME
  • FUCK YOU
  • FUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUCK
  • WHY AM I FUCKING PLAYING THIS GAME
  • I’m so fucKING DONE 
  • WHAT THE FUCK JUST HAPPENED
  • [PTERODACTYL SCREECH]

image

have you ever taken your dog to a jumping competition

(via m00psieshd)

No, I’m not ok. But I haven’t been ok since I was 11, maybe 12. I am still here though.
I’m still breathing. For me, sometimes, that will have to be enough
by Clementine Von Radics (via disnenchanted)

(Source: vomitbrat, via disnenchanted)

stand-up-comic-gifs:

I look around, there’s baby pictures of me everywhere. - Sheng Wang (x)

(via elliegalaxies)

interlube:

the year is 2040 you are still not superior for not listening to pop music

(Source: erlcareyes, via life-forthe-lovely)

Two weeks ago a man in France was arrested for raping his daughter. She’d gone to her school counselor and then the police, but they needed “hard evidence.” So, she videotaped her next assault. Her father was eventually arrested. His attorney explained, “There was a period when he was unemployed and in the middle of a divorce. He insists that these acts did not stretch back further than three or four months. His daughter says longer. But everyone should be very careful in what they say.” Because, really, even despite her seeking help, her testimony, her bravery in setting up a webcam to film her father raping her, you really can’t believe what the girl says, can you?

Everyone “knows” this. Even children.

Three years ago, in fly-on-the-wall fashion of parent drivers everywhere, I listened while a 14-year-old girl in the back seat of my car described how angry she was that her parents had stopped allowing her to walk home alone just because a girl in her neighborhood “claimed she was raped.” When I asked her if there was any reason to think the girl’s story was not true, she said, “Girls lie about rape all the time.” She didn’t know the person, she just assumed she was lying…

No one says, “You can’t trust women,” but distrust them we do. College students surveyed revealed that they think up to 50% of their female peers lie when they accuse someone of rape, despite wide-scale evidence and multi-country studies that show the incident of false rape reports to be in the 2%-8% range, pretty much the same as false claims for other crimes. As late as 2003, people jokingly (wink, wink) referred to Philadelphia’s sex crimes unit as “the lying bitch unit.” If an 11-year-old girl told an adult that her father took out a Craigslist ad to find someone to beat and rape her while he watched, as recently actually occurred, what do you think the response would be? Would she need to provide a videotape after the fact?

It goes way beyond sexual assault as well. That’s just the most likely and obvious demonstration of “women are born to lie” myths. Women’s credibility is questioned in the workplace, in courts, by law enforcement, in doctors’ offices, and in our political system. People don’t trust women to be bosses, or pilots, or employees. Pakistan’s controversial Hudood Ordinance still requires a female rape victim to procure four male witnesses to her rape or risk prosecution for adultery. In August, a survey of managers in the United States revealed that they overwhelmingly distrust women who request flextime. It’s notable, of course, that women are trusted to be mothers—the largest pool of undervalued, unpaid, economically crucial labor.


by Soraya Chemaly, How We Teach Our Kids That Women Are Liars  (via seebster)

(Source: sorayachemaly, via imbackwithfood)

tyleroakley:

I’m kind of in love with this.

(Source: megustamemes)

You’re going to be sad.
You’re going to want to scream and punch things.
Do it.
Let out every ounce of anger you have.
Sit on the floor and cry until you feel numb.
Listen to songs that make your heart sink to your feet.
Write angry letters to all the people who have broken you, left you, ignored you or hurt you.
Throw your hairbrush at the wall.
Do it twelve times.
Do it until you feel like you can breathe again.

You’re going to be sad.
You’re going to want to hurt yourself.
Don’t you dare do it.
Sit on the floor and watch cartoons like you did when you were little.
Listen to songs that make you want to dance around your bedroom in your underwear at 3 A.M.
Make paper airplanes out of those angry letters and watch them soar into the fireplace.
Brush all the knots out of your hair and say “I am worth it” into the mirror.
Say it twelve times.
Say it until you feel like you can breathe again.

You’re going to be sad.
You’re going to get through it.


by things i wish i could make you understand  (via pessimistiic)

(via jewist)

HIGH SCHOOL



This is how to run a stick of Chapstick
down the black boxes on your scantron
so the grading machine skips the wrong
answers. This is how to honor roll. Hell,
this is how to National Honor Society.
This is being voted “Most Likely to Marry
for Money” or “Talks the Most, Says the
Least” for senior superlatives. This is
stepping around the kids having panic
attacks in the hallway. This is being the
kid having a panic attack in the hallway.
This is making the A with purple moons
stamped under both eyes. We had to try.
This is telling the ACT supervisor you have
ADHD to get extra time. Today, the average
high school student has the same anxiety
levels as the average 1950’s psychiatric
patient. We know the Pythagorean theorem
by heart, but short-circuit when asked
“How are you?” We don’t know. We don’t
know. That wasn’t on the study guide.
We usually know the answer, but rarely
know ourselves.


by HIGH SCHOOL By Blythe Baird (via blythebrooklyn)

(via hollowandbold)